Hanging out with the U.S. Army Field Band

  Though it doesn’t look like much, there’s an old brick building on Fort George G. Meade,… [more]

Hanging out with the U.S. Army Field Band Hanging out with the U.S. Army Field Band

Leading by example: A Soldier speaks out about domestic violence

Lt. Col. Mary Peters, an enthusiastic and friendly woman, is everything you would expect from an Army… [more]

Leading by example: A Soldier speaks out about domestic violence Leading by example: A Soldier speaks out about domestic violence

World War I’s Hello Girls: Paving the way for women in the U.S. Army

You could call them forgotten, or even erased, the missing women of a lost generation. They’re the… [more]

World War I’s Hello Girls: Paving the way for women in the U.S. Army World War I's Hello Girls: Paving the way for women in the U.S. Army

Soldiers of darkness: Blinded Soldiers return to active duty

(This is part two of a two-part series about three Soldiers who returned to active duty after losing… [more]

Soldiers of darkness: Blinded Soldiers return to active duty Soldiers of darkness: Blinded Soldiers return to active duty

The day the world went black: Soldiers blinded in the line of duty

(This is part one of a two-part series about three Soldiers who were blinded in combat and their journeys… [more]

The day the world went black: Soldiers blinded in the line of duty The day the world went black: Soldiers blinded in the line of duty

Latest Features

Then-Spc. Troy Tow poses during a patrol of a food market in Afghanistan, June 17, 2011. A month later, Tow was wounded when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating while a member of the Fort Riley, Kan., Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader at the very same battalion, where he helps his fellow Soldiers heal. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. Troy Tow)
25 November 2013

A Soldier’s journey from warrior in care to caring for warriors

Four months after deploying to Afghanistan, Sgt. Troy Tow was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating at the Fort Riley Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader for the very same battalion, helping his fellow Soldiers heal.

Russell Hawkins displays the Medal of Honor presented by President George W. Bush posthumously to his stepfater, Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble. Kurt Bluedog, Keeble's grand-nephew, responds to questions from the press outside the White House following the March 3, 2008 ceremony. (DOD photo by Carrie McLeroy)
6 November 2013

Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble: Native American, Soldier, hero

Born on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Reservation in 1917, U.S. Army Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble became one of North Dakota's most decorated sons. In 2008, he was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his heroic actions during the Korean War.

Then-Spc. Ty Carter (left) checks a target during a patrol outside Outpost Fritsche, where he was deployed in 2009 with Blue Platoon, Bravo “Black Knight” Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The Soldiers were observing the village of Kamdesh. The area was so dangerous, Carter’s platoon sergeant, then-Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Hill, explained that they actually had to beg to go outside the wire, and several months later the men had to fight for their lives when 300-400 insurgents nearly overran nearby Combat Outpost Keating. Carter risked his life repeatedly to get a wounded Soldier, Spc. Stephan Mace, to safety during the battle, actions for which he will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony. (Photo courtesy of retired 1st Sgt. Jonathan Hill)
19 August 2013

In the aftermath of Keating: MOH nominee Carter gets help for PTSD

This is part two in a two-part series about Staff Sgt. Ty Carter, his heroic actions at Combat Outpost Keating and his struggle to overcome post-traumatic stress disorder. Carter will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony.

Blog

3 July 2013

Walk a mile in my brogans

A Soldiers Live journalist shares his experiences after spending time with Civil War re-enactors, many of whom are U.S. Army veterans.

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Photos

Trumpeter talk
Learning from the pros
Staff Sgt. Jared Morgan monitors the video quality during Staff Sgt. Robert Marino's xylophone performance with the Federal Brass Instrumentalists during a Google Hangout, Feb. 28, 2014. (U.S. Army photo by Jonathan E. Agee)
Staff Sgt. Carmen Russo plays a trombone solo during a Google Hangout between the U.S. Army Field Band Federal Brass Instrumentalists and students from Tyler Junior College in Tyler, Texas, Feb. 28, 2014. The band began using the hangouts to conduct virtual outreach last year, when budget cuts restricted travel. (DOD photo by Jacqueline M. Hames)
Staff Sgt. Sarah Schram-Borg (at the microphone) and Staff Sgt. Jared Morgan (on the computer) do a sound check before beginning a Google Hangout with students from Tyler Junior College in Tyler, Texas, Feb. 28, 2014. (DOD photo by Jacqueline M. Hames)
Staff Sgt. Jared Morgan ensures good video quality during Staff Sgt. Robert Marino's xylophone performance with the U.S. Army Field Band Federal Brass Instrumentalists during a Google Hangout at Fort Meade, Md., Feb. 28, 2014. (U.S. Army photo by Jonathan E. Agee)
There are resources available for victims of domestic violence. (DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson)
Lt. Col. Mary Peters poses in a conference room at the Army's Ready & Resilient Campaign headquarters in Arlington, Va. Peters revealed she had been a victim of domestic violence during her recent promotion ceremony, and decided to share her story with a wider audience to help others. “If it helps one person, it will be worth it." (DOD photo by Jacqueline M. Hames)
One Soldier shares her experience with domestic violence to help other victims. (DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson)
American Expeditionary Forces Commander Gen. John J. Pershing presents a Signal Corps telephone operator with the Distinguished Service Medal shortly after World War I. Seven of the women who served with the Signal Corps – best known as “Hello Girls” – received the medal for their dedication to getting important battlefield phone calls through, only to return home and learn that the Army never considered them Soldiers. Historians question how the women could have received military awards as civilians, and the women swore they were treated like and repeatedly told they were Soldiers. Their fight for official recognition lasted 60 years. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Women’s Museum)
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