Strategic trickery: The U.S. Army’s use of tactical deception

The art of tactical deception, or attempting to mislead enemy forces during a war, is a technique that… [more]

Strategic trickery: The U.S. Army’s use of tactical deception Strategic trickery: The U.S. Army's use of tactical deception

Angels in my life

Soldier's tough recovery relies on family, community support It’s like a premonition when… [more]

Angels in my life Angels in my life

The Spanish-American War

The dawn of U.S. military might The year was 1898. The United States stood on the brink of a… [more]

The Spanish-American War The Spanish-American War

The U.S. Army Chaplain Corps: providing care and comfort to Soldiers for 239 years

As long as there have been Soldiers in America, there have been chaplains. The Continental Congress created… [more]

The U.S. Army Chaplain Corps: providing care and comfort to Soldiers for 239 years The U.S. Army Chaplain Corps: providing care and comfort to Soldiers for 239 years

Arlington at 150: A tribute to the cemetery’s past, present and future

When Arlington National Cemetery was founded on June 15, 1864, it was out of necessity. But after 150… [more]

Arlington at 150: A tribute to the cemetery’s past, present and future Arlington at 150: A tribute to the cemetery's past, present and future

Latest Features

Capt. Justin Fitch
25 August 2014

A sense of mission, to the end

If doctors said you had a finite amount of time left, how would you spend your remaining days? It’s a question U.S. Army Capt. Justin Fitch has already answered.

Then-Spc. Troy Tow poses during a patrol of a food market in Afghanistan, June 17, 2011. A month later, Tow was wounded when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating while a member of the Fort Riley, Kan., Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader at the very same battalion, where he helps his fellow Soldiers heal. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. Troy Tow)
25 November 2013

A Soldier’s journey from warrior in care to caring for warriors

Four months after deploying to Afghanistan, Sgt. Troy Tow was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating at the Fort Riley Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader for the very same battalion, helping his fellow Soldiers heal.

Russell Hawkins displays the Medal of Honor presented by President George W. Bush posthumously to his stepfater, Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble. Kurt Bluedog, Keeble's grand-nephew, responds to questions from the press outside the White House following the March 3, 2008 ceremony. (DOD photo by Carrie McLeroy)
6 November 2013

Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble: Native American, Soldier, hero

Born on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Reservation in 1917, U.S. Army Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble became one of North Dakota's most decorated sons. In 2008, he was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his heroic actions during the Korean War.

Then-Spc. Ty Carter (left) checks a target during a patrol outside Outpost Fritsche, where he was deployed in 2009 with Blue Platoon, Bravo “Black Knight” Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The Soldiers were observing the village of Kamdesh. The area was so dangerous, Carter’s platoon sergeant, then-Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Hill, explained that they actually had to beg to go outside the wire, and several months later the men had to fight for their lives when 300-400 insurgents nearly overran nearby Combat Outpost Keating. Carter risked his life repeatedly to get a wounded Soldier, Spc. Stephan Mace, to safety during the battle, actions for which he will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony. (Photo courtesy of retired 1st Sgt. Jonathan Hill)
19 August 2013

In the aftermath of Keating: MOH nominee Carter gets help for PTSD

This is part two in a two-part series about Staff Sgt. Ty Carter, his heroic actions at Combat Outpost Keating and his struggle to overcome post-traumatic stress disorder. Carter will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony.

Blog

3 July 2013

Walk a mile in my brogans

A Soldiers Live journalist shares his experiences after spending time with Civil War re-enactors, many of whom are U.S. Army veterans.

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Photos

Capt. Abraham Alvarenga of the 102nd Group Support Batallion, 71st Theater Information Group assigned to Task Force Larimar, visits the Dominican Republic's Barahona province, May 7, 2014. The Military Information Support Operations group interviewed members of the community regarding the general and specialized medical services they received at no cost during the annual bilateral humanitarian exercise known as Beyond the Horizon. Such face-to-face communications are critical to MISO's mission today, in addition to MISO's traditional tactical deception role during conflicts. (Puerto Rico National Guard photo by Sgt. Wilma Orozco Fanfán)
U.S. Army Sgt. Nijoku Odom, right, intelligence analyst with 303rd Psychological Operations Company, and U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Jameson Dudley, left, crew master with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252, throw leaflets from a KC-130 Super Hercules over southern Afghanistan, Aug. 28, 2013. Leaflets were dropped in support of operations to defeat insurgency influence in the area. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
A inflatable "dummy" M4 Sherman tank sits in a field during World War II. Balloon tanks like this one were used by the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops, or "Ghost Army," as part of visual deception techniques to fool Axis forces. (U.S. Army photo)
A Confederate soldier poses in front of a Quaker gun, a log painted and mounted to resemble a cannon, from the main eastern theater of the Civil War in Centerville, Virginia, circa 1861-1862. (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)
DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson
Capt. Justin Fitch
Despite facing his own fight against terminal colon cancer, Capt. Justin Fitch of the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center has refused to stop working to reduce the number of suicides among veterans. (U.S. Army photo by David Kamm)
Early in his recovery, Maj. Matt Smith gets some fresh air outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, with the help of his son. (Photo courtesy of Maj. Matt Smith and Megan Smith)
Maj. Matt Smith and his wife, Megan, sit in front of the White House with their sons, 5-year-old Patrick, left, and 3-year-old Charlie, during a special July 4th event hosted by President Barack Obama and the First Lady in Washington, D.C. The event was in honor of service members and their families. (Photo courtesy of Maj. Matt Smith and Megan Smith)
This note from Chief Warrant Officer 2 Richard "Rick" Crunk and Chief Warrant Officer 2 Timothy Wing was placed in Maj. Matt Smith’s wet weather bag the day he was shot in Afghanistan. The Soldiers later discovered Smith had kept the note for motivation to recover in time for the brigade ball last November. (Photo courtesy of Maj. Matt Smith and Megan Smith)
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