Grief that never dies

Gold Star Mothers share their stories The Vietnam mother Emogene Cupp opened her door one… [more]

Grief that never dies Grief that never dies

Rocking to recovery

Wounded veterans turn to music to help heal wounds of war Now-retired Staff Sgt. Paul Delacerda… [more]

Rocking to recovery Rocking to recovery

Strategic trickery: The U.S. Army’s use of tactical deception

The art of tactical deception, or attempting to mislead enemy forces during a war, is a technique that… [more]

Strategic trickery: The U.S. Army’s use of tactical deception Strategic trickery: The U.S. Army's use of tactical deception

Angels in my life

Soldier's tough recovery relies on family, community support It’s like a premonition when… [more]

Angels in my life Angels in my life

The Spanish-American War

The dawn of U.S. military might The year was 1898. The United States stood on the brink of a… [more]

The Spanish-American War The Spanish-American War

Latest Features

Capt. Justin Fitch
25 August 2014

A sense of mission, to the end

If doctors said you had a finite amount of time left, how would you spend your remaining days? It’s a question U.S. Army Capt. Justin Fitch has already answered.

Then-Spc. Troy Tow poses during a patrol of a food market in Afghanistan, June 17, 2011. A month later, Tow was wounded when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating while a member of the Fort Riley, Kan., Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader at the very same battalion, where he helps his fellow Soldiers heal. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. Troy Tow)
25 November 2013

A Soldier’s journey from warrior in care to caring for warriors

Four months after deploying to Afghanistan, Sgt. Troy Tow was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating at the Fort Riley Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader for the very same battalion, helping his fellow Soldiers heal.

Russell Hawkins displays the Medal of Honor presented by President George W. Bush posthumously to his stepfater, Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble. Kurt Bluedog, Keeble's grand-nephew, responds to questions from the press outside the White House following the March 3, 2008 ceremony. (DOD photo by Carrie McLeroy)
6 November 2013

Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble: Native American, Soldier, hero

Born on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Reservation in 1917, U.S. Army Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble became one of North Dakota's most decorated sons. In 2008, he was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his heroic actions during the Korean War.

Then-Spc. Ty Carter (left) checks a target during a patrol outside Outpost Fritsche, where he was deployed in 2009 with Blue Platoon, Bravo “Black Knight” Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The Soldiers were observing the village of Kamdesh. The area was so dangerous, Carter’s platoon sergeant, then-Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Hill, explained that they actually had to beg to go outside the wire, and several months later the men had to fight for their lives when 300-400 insurgents nearly overran nearby Combat Outpost Keating. Carter risked his life repeatedly to get a wounded Soldier, Spc. Stephan Mace, to safety during the battle, actions for which he will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony. (Photo courtesy of retired 1st Sgt. Jonathan Hill)
19 August 2013

In the aftermath of Keating: MOH nominee Carter gets help for PTSD

This is part two in a two-part series about Staff Sgt. Ty Carter, his heroic actions at Combat Outpost Keating and his struggle to overcome post-traumatic stress disorder. Carter will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony.

Blog

26 September 2014

Please, ask me about my son

Gold Star Mother and retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin doesn't mind when you ask about her Soldier son, who was killed by insurgents in Iraq in 2007. But don't ever ask her if she's "gotten over it."

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Photos

Gold Star Mother
1st Lt. Thomas Martin attended West Point after serving as an enlisted Soldier. He was killed by small-arms fire in Iraq, Oct. 17, 2007, leaving his family shattered. His mother, Candy Martin, herself a Soldier at the time, turned her grief into a way to help other veterans, and joined the American Gold Star Mothers. She’s currently the organization’s second national vice president. (Photo courtesy of retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin)
Retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin lost her son, 1st Lt. Thomas Martin, to small arms fire in Iraq, Oct. 14, 2007, when she was still on active duty. In fact, she had served on a casualty notification team just months before. She is now the second national vice president of the American Gold Star Mothers and devotes much of her time to serving veterans. (Photo courtesy of retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin)
Capt. Glen P. Adams Jr. was killed in a helicopter accident, April 5, 1988, in Germany. The news was a terrible shock to his family, especially because it was peacetime. Once she connected with other Gold Star mothers, his mother, Norma Luther, said she could finally talk about him. (Photo courtesy of Norma Luther)
Norma Luther, right, poses with two other Gold Star mothers at Wilmington National Cemetery in North Carolina. Luther’s son, Capt. Glen P. Adams Jr., was killed in a helicopter accident, April 5, 1988. After reading every book on grief she could find, Luther realized the best way to heal was to serve others. She eventually became national president of the American Gold Star Mothers. (Photo courtesy of Norma Luther)
Cpl. Rex Sherman of the 75th Ranger Regiment was only 18 when he was killed in Vietnam, Nov. 19, 1969. He was shot multiple times while capturing North Vietnamese Soldiers and was posthumously awarded the Silver Star. His mother, Ann Y. Sherman Wolcott, had three other children to care for despite her grief. She said working with other Gold Star mothers and veterans has helped her tremendously. (Photo courtesy of Ann Y. Sherman Wolcott)
Ann Y. Sherman Wolcott was only 37 when her son Cpl. Rex Sherman was killed in Vietnam. With three other children, including a toddler, she had to go on with her life. She found that serving others, especially Vietnam veterans, was a good outlet for her grief -- so was joining American Gold Star mothers. (Photo courtesy of Ann Y. Sherman Wolcott)
Cpl. Robert W. Cupp was killed by a booby trap in Vietnam, June 6, 1968, and was buried June 17 -- his 21st birthday. His mother, Emogene, immediately joined American Gold Star Mothers, finding comfort and kinship with women who knew exactly what she was going through without her son. (Photo courtesy of Emogene Cupp)
At almost 95, Emogene Cupp is the oldest past president of the American Gold Star Mothers. Her son, Cpl. Robert W. Cupp, was killed by a booby trap in Vietnam, June 6, 1968. Cupp has found great comfort from working to support other veterans, and was even instrumental in the creation of the Vietnam Wall. (Photo courtesy of Emogene Cupp)
Ann Y. Sherman Wolcott, then national president of American Gold Star Mothers, honors her son Cpl. Rex Sherman at the Vietnam Wall in Washington, in 2003. Whenever she misses him or feels sad, she makes it a point to serve others, especially Vietnam veterans. Her son was shot multiple times on a mission to capture North Vietnamese soldiers, and posthumously received a Silver Star. According to Wolcott, there have been major improvements since Vietnam in the way surviving families are treated. (DOD photo)
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