Arlington at 150: A tribute to the cemetery’s past, present and future

When Arlington National Cemetery was founded on June 15, 1864, it was out of necessity. But after 150… [more]

Arlington at 150: A tribute to the cemetery’s past, present and future Arlington at 150: A tribute to the cemetery's past, present and future

Former 10th Mountain Soldier turns tragedy into ‘golden’ opportunity

  It was 2007. The Soldiers were six months into their deployment to Iraq. The “Golden… [more]

Former 10th Mountain Soldier turns tragedy into ‘golden’ opportunity Former 10th Mountain Soldier turns tragedy into ‘golden’ opportunity

Learning new strategies: Sesame Street teaches military kids about resilience

The library technician at the Fort George G. Meade, Md., Post Library Annex, greeted mothers and their… [more]

Learning new strategies: Sesame Street teaches military kids about resilience Learning new strategies: Sesame Street teaches military kids about resilience

AW2 marks 10 years of support to Soldiers and families

This year will mark 13 years since 9-11. Thirteen years of combat and injuries, many of which would have… [more]

AW2 marks 10 years of support to Soldiers and families AW2 marks 10 years of support to Soldiers and families

Hanging out with the U.S. Army Field Band

  Though it doesn’t look like much, there’s an old brick building on Fort George G. Meade,… [more]

Hanging out with the U.S. Army Field Band Hanging out with the U.S. Army Field Band

Latest Features

Then-Spc. Troy Tow poses during a patrol of a food market in Afghanistan, June 17, 2011. A month later, Tow was wounded when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating while a member of the Fort Riley, Kan., Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader at the very same battalion, where he helps his fellow Soldiers heal. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. Troy Tow)
25 November 2013

A Soldier’s journey from warrior in care to caring for warriors

Four months after deploying to Afghanistan, Sgt. Troy Tow was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating at the Fort Riley Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader for the very same battalion, helping his fellow Soldiers heal.

Russell Hawkins displays the Medal of Honor presented by President George W. Bush posthumously to his stepfater, Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble. Kurt Bluedog, Keeble's grand-nephew, responds to questions from the press outside the White House following the March 3, 2008 ceremony. (DOD photo by Carrie McLeroy)
6 November 2013

Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble: Native American, Soldier, hero

Born on the Sisseton-Wahpeton Reservation in 1917, U.S. Army Master Sgt. Woodrow Keeble became one of North Dakota's most decorated sons. In 2008, he was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for his heroic actions during the Korean War.

Then-Spc. Ty Carter (left) checks a target during a patrol outside Outpost Fritsche, where he was deployed in 2009 with Blue Platoon, Bravo “Black Knight” Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. The Soldiers were observing the village of Kamdesh. The area was so dangerous, Carter’s platoon sergeant, then-Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Hill, explained that they actually had to beg to go outside the wire, and several months later the men had to fight for their lives when 300-400 insurgents nearly overran nearby Combat Outpost Keating. Carter risked his life repeatedly to get a wounded Soldier, Spc. Stephan Mace, to safety during the battle, actions for which he will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony. (Photo courtesy of retired 1st Sgt. Jonathan Hill)
19 August 2013

In the aftermath of Keating: MOH nominee Carter gets help for PTSD

This is part two in a two-part series about Staff Sgt. Ty Carter, his heroic actions at Combat Outpost Keating and his struggle to overcome post-traumatic stress disorder. Carter will receive the Medal of Honor in an Aug. 26 White House ceremony.

Blog

3 July 2013

Walk a mile in my brogans

A Soldiers Live journalist shares his experiences after spending time with Civil War re-enactors, many of whom are U.S. Army veterans.

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Photos

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Dr. Stephen Carney, Arlingtion National Cemetery's command historian, explains the cemetery's origins, May 28, 2014, near Section 27, the oldest part of the cemetery. Carney said the cemetery was born out of necessity, to bury the dead during the Civil War, but has evolved into a national shrine. (DOD photo by Carrie McLeroy)
Patrick K. Hallinan, executive director for Army National Cemeteries, said the core mission of Arlington is to bury active duty service members, retired service members and veterans with dignity and honor, maintaining the grounds of the cemetery as a national shrine. (DOD photo by Carrie McLeroy)
The ANC Explorer app allows users to search for a specific gravesite by name, date of birth, date of death or internment and by location.
This is the landing page for Arlington National Cemetery's smart phone app, the ANC Explorer. The app was developled as part of the cemetery's digitization process, and pushes notifications to users about events and emergency situations while they are on the cemetery property.
This proposed site plan shows the Millennium Expansion Project, which is estimated to add close to 30,000 additional burial and niche spaces to Arlington National Cemetery. (Illustration courtesy of Arlington National Cemetery)
Stephen Van Hoven, chief of Arlington National Cemetery's horticulture division and master arborist, installs the new tree label on the cemetery's Yellowwood State Champion Tree in Section 23. The horticuluture division installed labels on all three of ANC's state champions, a major step in officially establishing Arlingtion as an arboretum. The labels include the tree's latin and common names, family name and the native range of the tree. (Photo by Melissa Bohan, Arlington National Cemetery)
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