The art of healing

  The mask is green with black stripes, the pattern echoing the face paint many Soldiers… [more]

The art of healing The art of healing

Growing up Army

An NFL PR exec says service life was key to success   Chad Steele has what serious sports… [more]

Growing up Army Growing up Army

Vivandières and spies

 Women’s roles in the Civil War Women have historically contributed to the Army in often-unseen… [more]

Vivandières and spies Vivandières and spies

Army experts say sleep helps Soldiers build resilience, strength

It happens night after night: Retired Staff Sgt. Spencer Milo lies in bed, unable to sleep. He tosses.… [more]

Army experts say sleep helps Soldiers build resilience, strength Army experts say sleep helps Soldiers build resilience, strength

Come Out Fighting: The first African-American tankers in combat

The explosion was massive, far larger than the men of the 761st Tank Battalion were expecting when they… [more]

Come Out Fighting: The first African-American tankers in combat Come Out Fighting: The first African-American tankers in combat

Latest Features

A biohazard sign outside a support laboratory for the Whole System Live Agent Test chamber on Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. The WSLAT chamber can handle agents up to biological safety level three, which includes biological warfare agents that can cause treatable diseases in humans. (DOD photo by Jacqueline M. Hames)
2 April 2015

Clearing the air

The Whole System Live Agent Test chamber will enable U.S. Army scientists to evaluate the effectiveness of bio detection gear with warfighter safety in mind.

The M50 gas mask, Joint Services Aircrew Member MPU-5 and JSAM Fixed Wing masks featured in this image await SMARTMAN testing at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, Aug. 29, 2011. The SMARTMAN is a human bust fixture designed for testing gas masks and other breathing apparatus. (U.S. Army photo by Al Vogel)
27 March 2015

From test tube to battlefield

The U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground is in the business of validating defensive and offensive capabilities before putting them in the hands of warfighters.

A German tank crew guards a column of American prisoners of war during World War II. Like the members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, these men were doomed to a hellish existence until Allied troops began liberating POW camps in the spring of 1945. The men of the I&R Platoon had been captured on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944. Their 12-hour stand against a German battalion in Lanzerath, Belgium, helped delay the initial German force long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
26 January 2015

One more battle

After a 12-hour stand on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, the men of the 394th Regiment's Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon faced a new fight for survival in Nazi POW camps.

Private First Class Tammy Scriven, an information technology specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Signal Brigade, provides desktop computer support, Dec. 13, 2014, at the Barclay Training Center in Monrovia, Liberia. Scriven says her family does special things to let her know they are thinking of her during the holidays. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Rashene Mincy, 55th Signal Company-Combat Camera)
22 December 2014

Deployed during the holidays: staying connected

Deployments are hard on Soldiers and their families, but they can be especially difficult during the holidays. Soldiers and their families share ways to stay connected and reduce stress.

Deep in the Ardennes Forest, on a hill above the village of Lanzerath, Belgium, members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division would have camouflaged their foxholes like this unidentified unit. The foxholes, fortified with three to five thick logs each, helped the Soldiers not only withstand three German assaults the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944, but inflict withering casualties before they finally ran out of ammunition and were captured. They delayed the initial German force for half a day, long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
16 December 2014

The Battle of Lanzerath

Outnumbered 20 to one, this is the story of how a single U.S. Army intelligence and reconnaissance platoon held up the German advance, changing the outcome of the Battle of the Bulge.

Recon Warrior Challenge program participants explore a helicopter while touring Fort Benning, Georgia, July 1, 2014. (Photo courtesy of Staff Sgt. Rob McEver)
10 November 2014

Up to the challenge

This Fort Benning NCO is using what he’s learned in the Army to instill in local youth confidence, discipline and respect.

Chef Robert Irvine and actor Gary Sinise welcome Staff Sgt. Tony Wood and his wife Joedi to their newly renovated home on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Irvine, Sinise, Wood’s buddy Bryan Anderson (in the wheelchair) and hundreds of volunteers surprised the couple by fixing and decorating their home, which had started falling apart almost as soon as they bought it to accommodate their biological children, adopted children and foster children. Wood, who was wounded in Iraq, has overcome massive internal injuries, traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder to stay in the Army. The special will air across six channels the evening of Veterans Day. (Photo by Jeremiah Alley, courtesy of the Food Network)
10 November 2014

A Hero’s Welcome

Hundreds of friends, neighbors and fellow Soldiers team up with celebrities and open their hearts to help a Soldier and his wife continue to open their home to foster kids.

Never forgotten
6 October 2014

Faith, friends and paying it forward

When her husband was killed in Afghanistan in 2011, a widow and her three children left the Fort Drum, New York, area they knew and loved. Today, they are back, and serving as a link between Soldiers and the community.

Blog

6 March 2015

Sleep tips from the experts

We know it can be tough to get a solid night’s sleep, so we turned to the Army’s sleep experts and tracked down their top tips.

5 December 2014

How to train a service dog

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Spencer Milo, who participated in the service dog-training program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, talks about what goes into getting a dog ready to partner with a wounded veteran.

26 September 2014

Please, ask me about my son

Gold Star Mother and retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin doesn't mind when you ask about her Soldier son, who was killed by insurgents in Iraq in 2007. But don't ever ask her if she's "gotten over it."

All Posts

Photos

Sgt. Robert Fox created this collage in art therapy at the National Center of Excellence for the Intrepid’s satellite office at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, to help him understand a devastating event that happened in combat. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
Sgt. Robert Fox displays the memorial box he created in art therapy at the National Center of Excellence for the Intrepid’s satellite office at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Fox decorated the box with his nametape, a combat action badge and his unit patches, as well as photos of his unit. Inside, he placed a letter to a friend killed in action, photos of other friends – one lost – and a model of a can of his friend’s favorite beer. Fox also created a small model car to represent the lost innocence of a dead child. The box is one of Fox’s most impactful projects because of the memories it brought up, and because it helped him process some of the trauma after years of pain. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
When Sgt. Robert Fox started painting this Soldier in art therapy at the National Center of Excellence for the Intrepid’s satellite office at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, it was supposed to represent a friend who was killed by an improvised-explosive device. However, as Fox painted, the art slowly morphed into a self-portrait of Fox himself running away from his fears during that deployment. Fox said art therapy has been one of the most helpful treatments he has received for traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. (DOD photo of Sgt. Robert Fox painting by Elizabeth M. Collins)
Sgt. Robert Fox painted this mask as his first art therapy project at the National Center of Excellence for the Intrepid’s satellite office at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The front of the mask is designed to look like military face paint, and reflects the image of strength and discipline he wants to project to the world. The inside of the mask, however, features tears and blood – the pain and suffering he feels. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
Sgt. Robert Fox painted this mask as his first art therapy project at the National Center of Excellence for the Intrepid’s satellite office at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The front of the mask is designed to look like military face paint, and reflects the image of strength and discipline he wants to project to the world. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
Sgt. Robert Fox models the mask he painted as his first art therapy project at the National Center of Excellence for the Intrepid’s satellite office at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The front of the mask is designed to look like military face paint, and reflects the image of strength and discipline he wants to project to the world. The inside of the mask, however, features tears and blood – the pain and suffering he feels. He was initially skeptical of art therapy, but as he started creating, he finally found himself able to talk about the trauma of his five combat deployments. (Photo illustration -- original DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers
The Rookery at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, whose previous occupants include Gen. Douglas MacArthur, was one of Chad Steele's boyhood homes. (U.S Army photo courtesy of Fort Leavenworth Public Affairs Office)
Fort Leavenworth's Buffalo Soldier Memorial Park holds a very special place among
Steele family memories. Chad's grandfather, retired Army Maj. Frank Steele, served as a Buffalo Soldier. (U.S. Army photo courtesy of Fort Leavenworth Garrison Public Affairs Office)
Staff Sgt. and Mrs. "Buck" Robinson (left) stood up for Staff Sgt. and Mrs. Frank Steele -- Chad Steele's grandparents -- at their wedding. The men were best friends and fellow Buffalo Soldiers.  (Photo courtesy of the Steele family)
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