Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 3: On a mission

A doctor, a commander, a Soldier and an Army spouse talk suicide prevention and looking out for Soldiers. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 3: On a mission Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 3: On a mission

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 2: A life rebuilt

A suicidal first sergeant finds the strength to get help for PTSD and reclaim his life. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson)

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 2: A life rebuilt Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 2: A life rebuilt

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson part 1: A broken life

One Soldier, leader and family man recalls being driven to the brink of suicide. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson part 1: A broken life Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson part 1: A broken life

Former West Point notables bring Army values to gridiron

Strong Army ties were in evidence when a small-university football team took to the field at historic Camp Blanding, Florida, for preseason camp. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Former West Point notables bring Army values to gridiron Former West Point notables bring Army values to gridiron

Kickin’ heads and takin’ names

“Soldiers first” is the mantra for the 2016 All-Army Taekwondo Team. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Kickin’ heads and takin’ names Kickin' heads and takin' names

Latest Features

Cpl. Ralph Hockley’s Bremen Detention Camp Pass from post-World War II Germany. (Photo courtesy of retired Col. Ralph M. Hockley)
5 May 2016

Witness to history

In his youth, Col. Ralph M. Hockley was a German Jew on the run from the Nazis. Years later, he would return to Germany as an American Soldier, fight in the Korean War and serve as a intelligence agent during the Cold War.

Army Strong Family
14 April 2016

Giving all they can

The McIntyre-Brewer family has remained selfless and resilient in the face of deployments and life-threatening illnesses, advocating for veterans, wounded warriors and sick children.

(U.S. Army graphic)
24 March 2016

Awarding the Medal of Honor

Army officials work to ensure heroes get the medals and recognition they deserve, even decades later.

Nicole Witmer, now a volunteer ambassador in the Veterans Ambassador Program, speaks with a veteran during the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center's Army Heritage Days in 2014. It was this event that she said inspired her to participate in the program.
10 November 2015

Every Army story is important

USAHEC's Veterans Ambassador Program aims to preserve the past through Soldiers' oral histories.

Sgt. Angelo Gepponi, who was a cook with the 77th Infantry Division in World War II, would paint scenes from daily life around camp. This watercolor, called "Field Mess Line (Untitled)," depicts Soldiers waiting to get chow. Gepponi's combat works will be displayed in the "Cook, Pot and Palette" exhibit at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, until December 2015. (Courtesy of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center)
9 September 2015

‘Cook, Pot and Palette’

Sgt. Angelo Gepponi’s field art from World War II continues to inspire artists today and serves as a witness to history.

Blog

17 June 2016

AW2 commander talks adaptive sports

Col. David S. Oeschger, one of the key members of the Army’s Warrior Transition Command, talks about his service, his wounds and how adaptive sports are helping Soldiers and veterans heal.

11 December 2015

Little-known facts about the Army-Navy game

Dec. 12, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the U.S. Naval Academy meet on the gridiron for the 116th time. The game steeped in tradition that's come to be known as "America's Game" has some fascinating little-known facts.

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Photos

1st Sgt. Landon Jackson pauses during a mountain bike ride in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, in 2014. Jackson loves to mountain bike, and spent a couple of weeks doing nothing but when discharged from inpatient behavioral health, waiting to start an outpatient treatment program for post-traumatic stress and depression. He’s on a mission to save other Soldiers, and encourages them to pursue their hobbies and interests, especially outdoor pursuits, to build their resilience. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
1st Sgt. Landon Jackson, right, poses with his wife, Sarah; daughter, Zoey, and sons, Jared and Erich (front) on a hike at the Prince William Forest Park in Virginia in 2014. Behind their smiles, their lives were falling apart in the face of Jackson’s post-traumatic stress and terrifying rages. Sarah eventually kicked him out in March 2015, telling him he had to get help before he came home. At one point, he was seconds from opening his gun case and killing himself. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
The 55th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company poses in front of the Lincoln Memorial in 2014 after a company run. Its first sergeant, 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson, would be admitted to behavioral health the following March with suicidal ideation and post-traumatic stress disorder. Jackson told his Soldiers everything, and some talked to him about their own troubles. He has since made it his mission to educate other Soldiers about the importance of getting help. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
1st Sgt. Landon Jackson leads the 749th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company prior to a change of command in 2013 at Fort Carson, Colorado. Jackson soon headed to Fort Belvoir, Virginia, and the 55th EOD Company. After he moved, and had a chance to catch his breath after four near back-to-back combat deployments. He was forced to finally confront his post-traumatic stress and what his resulting behavoir was doing to his family when his wife kicked him out in March 2015. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
(DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)
1st Sgt. Landon Jackson poses with his wife, Sarah; daughter, Zoey, and sons, Jared and Erich (center) at Cedar Point, Ohio, in the summer of 2015. The Jackson family is still getting back on track as Jackson recovers from post-traumatic stress. Life at home had gotten so bad, and his rages were so terrifying, that Sarah kicked him out last winter, telling him he had to get help before he came home. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
1st Sgt. Landon Jackson, right, poses with his wife, Sarah; daughter, Zoey, and sons, Jared and Erich (front) on a hike at the Prince William Forest Park in Virginia in 2014. Behind their smiles, their lives were falling apart in the face of Jackson’s post-traumatic stress and terrifying rages. Sarah eventually kicked him out in March 2015, telling him he had to get help before he came home. At one point, he was seconds from opening his gun case and killing himself. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
1st Sgt. Landon Jackson helps his younger son, Erich, climb a rock wall at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Jackson is a loving father, but in later years, his post-traumatic stress began to spiral out of control and his rages escalated, life became unbearable for his family. Jackson’s wife, Sarah, finally told him he would have to leave home until he got real, serious help. He hit rock bottom, almost shot himself, and finally drove himself to the ER. Now he’s on a mission to help other Soldiers. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
1st Sgt. Landon Jackson stands on an outpost overlooking the Arghandab River Valley, Afghanistan. This deployment compounded the post-traumatic symptoms from which he already suffered. When he returned hom, he hit rock bottom. After almost committing suicide, he finally got help. Now he’s on a mission to help other Soldiers. (Photo courtesy of 1st Sgt. Landon Jackson)
A suicidal first sergeant finds the strength to get help for PTSD and reclaim his life. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson)
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