It’s in their genes

Tropic Lightning’s history and vision fuel key role in Pacific Rebalance. (DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

It’s in their genes It's in their genes

Running the ‘Gauntlet’

Soldiers fight through some of the Army’s darkest days in the Korean War.

Running the ‘Gauntlet’ Running the ‘Gauntlet’

Program offers enlisted Soldiers the opportunity to become doctors

A DOD program is helping five U.S. Army NCOs pursue their dreams to study medicine, while continuing to serve on active duty. (DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Program offers enlisted Soldiers the opportunity to become doctors Program offers enlisted Soldiers the opportunity to become doctors

Field docs attack Texas-sized challenge in annual skills rodeo

The Army’s 2015 Best Medic Competition tests toughness, perseverance and timely, accurate care for the wounded. (DOD graphic by Pete Ising, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Field docs attack Texas-sized challenge in annual skills rodeo Field docs attack Texas-sized challenge in annual skills rodeo

Spinning war stories at the Double Nickels Speakeasy

Veterans at the Armed Forces Retirement Home swap tales of war and peace. (DOD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Spinning war stories at the Double Nickels Speakeasy Spinning war stories at the Double Nickels Speakeasy

Latest Features

Army Strong Family
14 April 2016

Giving all they can

The McIntyre-Brewer family has remained selfless and resilient in the face of deployments and life-threatening illnesses, advocating for veterans, wounded warriors and sick children.

(U.S. Army graphic)
24 March 2016

Awarding the Medal of Honor

Army officials work to ensure heroes get the medals and recognition they deserve, even decades later.

Nicole Witmer, now a volunteer ambassador in the Veterans Ambassador Program, speaks with a veteran during the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center's Army Heritage Days in 2014. It was this event that she said inspired her to participate in the program.
10 November 2015

Every Army story is important

USAHEC's Veterans Ambassador Program aims to preserve the past through Soldiers' oral histories.

Sgt. Angelo Gepponi, who was a cook with the 77th Infantry Division in World War II, would paint scenes from daily life around camp. This watercolor, called "Field Mess Line (Untitled)," depicts Soldiers waiting to get chow. Gepponi's combat works will be displayed in the "Cook, Pot and Palette" exhibit at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, until December 2015. (Courtesy of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center)
9 September 2015

‘Cook, Pot and Palette’

Sgt. Angelo Gepponi’s field art from World War II continues to inspire artists today and serves as a witness to history.

Blog

11 December 2015

Little-known facts about the Army-Navy game

Dec. 12, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the U.S. Naval Academy meet on the gridiron for the 116th time. The game steeped in tradition that's come to be known as "America's Game" has some fascinating little-known facts.

30 September 2015

Suicide: Recognizing the warning signs

Experts talk about how to recognize warning signs for suicide, even when, like many military families, you’re hundreds of miles away.

30 September 2015

What parental suicide means for children

Parental death, especially by suicide, has a profound psychological affect on the children left behind. Experts urge remaining family members to get them professional help.

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Photos

Army Strong Family
Chelle McIntyre-Brewer and her son Cavan, now 14, pose with First Lady Michelle Obama after Chelle received the Presidential Citizens Medal for her work advocating for wounded warriors, high-risk Army families and special needs families. She passed that passion and selfless service on to her children. (Photo courtesy of Chelle McIntyre-Brewer)
The McIntyre-Brewer family (Lorelei, now 10; Capt. Steven Brewer; Chelle; Killian, now 3; and Cavan, now 14) poses with the Marines they adopted as uncles and who helped inspire their advocacy: Mark Fidler and his brother-in-law, Tim Donely (with Donely’s wife and Mark’s sister, Kelly). After meeting Fidler, Cavan decided to raise and train pack goats to assist Fidler and other wounded warriors who enjoy nature and like to hike. Cavan also distributes socks and other personal items to veterans’ hospitals through his Socks for Vets program, and gives out backpacks full of nonperishable food and necessities to homeless veterans. He was honored by Operation Homefront as the 2015 Military Child of the Year for the Army. His sister, Lorelie, 10, was born with half a heart and received the honor this year in recognition of her work to help other pediatric cardiology patients. Together, Fidler and Lorelei are known as the “halfsies.” (Photo courtesy of Chelle McIntyre-Brewer)
Capt. Steven Brewer holds his daughter, Lorelei, now 10, around the time of her third open heart surgery. Today, Lorelei is Operation Homefront’s 2016 Military Child of the Year for the Army for her support of other kids with life-changing health issues. Lorelie’s 14-year-old brother, Cavan, received the award in 2015 for his work with veterans and wounded warriors. (Photo courtesy of Chelle McIntyre-Brewer)
Lorelie McIntyre-Brewer and her 14-year-old brother, Cavan, deliver pediatric heart compression pillows to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Born with half a heart and numerous other health problems, 10-year-old Lorelei McIntyre-Brewer has had more than 20 operations and procedures, including three open heart surgeries. After her third surgery, Lorelei’s lungs collapsed, leaving her drowning in fluid. Doctors put in extra tubes and they also tried a compression heart pillow. The pillow, however, was too big for a 3-year-old, so two years later she learned to sew compression pillows and founded Heart Hugs. Lorelei is Operation Homefront’s 2016 Military Child of the Year for the Army. Cavan received the award in 2015 for his work with veterans and wounded warriors. (Photo courtesy of Chelle McIntyre-Brewer)
Cavan McIntyre-Brewer, now 14, comforts his sister, Lorelei, now 10, around the time of her third open heart surgery. After the surgery, Lorelei’s lungs collapsed, leaving her drowning in fluid. Doctors put in extra tubes and they also tried a compression heart pillow. The pillow, however, was too big for a tiny, 3-year-old girl, so two years later she learned to sew and founded Heart Hugs, which distributes child-sized compression pillows to pediatric cardiology patients. Lorelei is Operation Homefront’s 2016 Military Child of the Year for the Army. Cavan received the award in 2015 for his work with veterans and wounded warriors. (Photo courtesy of Chelle McIntyre-Brewer)
Capt. Steven Brewer and his wife, Chelle McIntyre-Brewer, pose with their three children, Cavan, 14; Killian, 3; and Lorelie, 10. The family has remained resilient and giving in the face of numerous challenges, from Brewer’s three deployments to illness. All three children have chronic health problems, although Lorelei, who was born with half a heart, has gone through the most. The whole family works as advocates for veterans, wounded warriors and sick children, and both Cavan and Lorelei have been honored as Military Child of the Year, in 2015 and 2016, respectively. (Photo courtesy of Chelle McIntyre-Brewer)
(U.S. Army graphic)
Vietnam veterans Sgt. 1st Class Melvin Morris, Master Sgt. Jose Rodela, and Sgt. Santiago J. Erevia, along with 21 other veterans from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, had their Distinguished Service Crosses upgraded to Medals of Honor. Here, they take part in a Medal of Honor presentation ceremony at the White House, March 18, 2014. Of the 24 who fought in World War II, Korea and Vietnam, only Morris, Rodela and Erevia were alive to receive their medals. Erevia passed away March 22, 2016 at the age of 70. (Department of Defense photo by J.D. Leipold, Army News Service, Defense Media Activity)
1st Lt. Alonzo Hereford Cushing was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, Nov. 6, 2014, for actions during the Civil War’s Battle of Gettysburg. Cushing commanded 126 men and six cannons positioned on Cemetery Ridge, July 3, 1863. Although severely wounded, Cushing refused to evacuate and directed the operation of his two remaining guns. He would eventually fall in battle. Workers at Army Human Resources Command’s Awards and Decorations Branch are responsible for processing all medals and awards, even awards that are decades — and in this case, more than a century — old. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army)
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