The healing power of dogs

Soldiers with PTSD train service dogs for wounded veterans   Sometimes the best therapy… [more]

The healing power of dogs The healing power of dogs

Horse healing

Veterans take to the farm to overcome invisible war wounds On an expansive, scenic farm in Solvang,… [more]

Horse healing Horse healing

The sergeant major of the Army: Leader and communicator

At the heart of today’s Army is a noncommissioned officer corps that values professionalism and excellence… [more]

The sergeant major of the Army: Leader and communicator The sergeant major of the Army: Leader and communicator

Grief that never dies

Gold Star Mothers share their stories The Vietnam mother Emogene Cupp opened her door one… [more]

Grief that never dies Grief that never dies

Rocking to recovery

Wounded veterans turn to music to help heal wounds of war Now-retired Staff Sgt. Paul Delacerda… [more]

Rocking to recovery Rocking to recovery

Latest Features

Deep in the Ardennes Forest, on a hill above the village of Lanzerath, Belgium, members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division would have camouflaged their foxholes like this unidentified unit. The foxholes, fortified with three to five thick logs each, helped the Soldiers not only withstand three German assaults the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944, but inflict withering casualties before they finally ran out of ammunition and were captured. They delayed the initial German force for half a day, long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
16 December 2014

The Battle of Lanzerath

Outnumbered 20 to one, this is the story of how a single U.S. Army intelligence and reconnaissance platoon held up the German advance, changing the outcome of the Battle of the Bulge.

Recon Warrior Challenge program participants explore a helicopter while touring Fort Benning, Georgia, July 1, 2014. (Photo courtesy of Staff Sgt. Rob McEver)
10 November 2014

Up to the challenge

This Fort Benning NCO is using what he’s learned in the Army to instill in local youth confidence, discipline and respect.

Chef Robert Irvine and actor Gary Sinise welcome Staff Sgt. Tony Wood and his wife Joedi to their newly renovated home on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Irvine, Sinise, Wood’s buddy Bryan Anderson (in the wheelchair) and hundreds of volunteers surprised the couple by fixing and decorating their home, which had started falling apart almost as soon as they bought it to accommodate their biological children, adopted children and foster children. Wood, who was wounded in Iraq, has overcome massive internal injuries, traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder to stay in the Army. The special will air across six channels the evening of Veterans Day. (Photo by Jeremiah Alley, courtesy of the Food Network)
10 November 2014

A Hero’s Welcome

Hundreds of friends, neighbors and fellow Soldiers team up with celebrities and open their hearts to help a Soldier and his wife continue to open their home to foster kids.

Never forgotten
6 October 2014

Faith, friends and paying it forward

When her husband was killed in Afghanistan in 2011, a widow and her three children left the Fort Drum, New York, area they knew and loved. Today, they are back, and serving as a link between Soldiers and the community.

Capt. Justin Fitch
25 August 2014

A sense of mission, to the end

If doctors said you had a finite amount of time left, how would you spend your remaining days? It’s a question U.S. Army Capt. Justin Fitch has already answered.

Then-Spc. Troy Tow poses during a patrol of a food market in Afghanistan, June 17, 2011. A month later, Tow was wounded when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating while a member of the Fort Riley, Kan., Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader at the very same battalion, where he helps his fellow Soldiers heal. (Photo courtesy of Sgt. Troy Tow)
25 November 2013

A Soldier’s journey from warrior in care to caring for warriors

Four months after deploying to Afghanistan, Sgt. Troy Tow was wounded by an improvised explosive device. He spent months recovering and rehabilitating at the Fort Riley Warrior Transition Battalion, and now serves as a squad leader for the very same battalion, helping his fellow Soldiers heal.

Blog

5 December 2014

How to train a service dog

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Spencer Milo, who participated in the service dog-training program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, talks about what goes into getting a dog ready to partner with a wounded veteran.

26 September 2014

Please, ask me about my son

Gold Star Mother and retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin doesn't mind when you ask about her Soldier son, who was killed by insurgents in Iraq in 2007. But don't ever ask her if she's "gotten over it."

All Posts

Photos

Deep in the Ardennes Forest, on a hill above the village of Lanzerath, Belgium, members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division would have camouflaged their foxholes like this unidentified unit. The foxholes, fortified with three to five thick logs each, helped the Soldiers not only withstand three German assaults the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944, but inflict withering casualties before they finally ran out of ammunition and were captured. They delayed the initial German force for half a day, long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
Deep in the Ardennes Forest, on a hill above the village of Lanzerath, Belgium, members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division would have camouflaged their foxholes like this unidentified unit. The foxholes, fortified with three to five thick logs each, helped the Soldiers not only withstand three German assaults the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944, but inflict withering casualties before they finally ran out of ammunition and were captured. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
1st Lt. Lyle Bouck was only 20 years old when he took command of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, and led his 17 men through a brutal German attack in Lanzerath, Belgium, the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944. Bouck and his men delayed the initial German force for half a day, long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. (U.S. Army photo)
Staff Sgt. Spencer Milo pets Manny, a golden retriever undergoing training to become a service dog for a wounded veteran. Milo participated in the service dog training program at Walter Reed National  Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, as part of his therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury, and said it was instrumental in his recovery. (Photo courtesy of  Warrior Canine Connection)
Future service dog Gabe naps in front of his honorary promotion certificate from the U.S. Army. Gabe was trained by service members recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, and was paired with retired Staff Sgt. Justin Lansford, an amputee, through Warrior Canine Connection. (Photo courtesy of Carol Balmes and Warrior Canine Connection)
Retired Staff Sgt. Justin Lansford wrestles with his service dog, Gabe, at the Army Ten Miler. Gabe helps Lansford with many every day tasks, from bringing him items to opening doors. He also takes the focus off of Lansford’s prosthetic when the two are in public. Gabe was placed with Lansford through Warrior Canine Connection, and was trained by service members recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (Photo courtesy of Carol Balmes)
Retired Staff Sgt. Justin Lansford poses with his service dog, Gabe, at the Army Ten Miler. Gabe helps Lansford with many every day tasks, from bringing him items to opening doors. He also takes the focus off of Lansford’s prosthetic when the two are in public. Gabe was placed with Lansford through Warrior Canine Connection, and was trained by service members recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (Photo courtesy of Carol Balmes)
Retired Staff Sgt. Justin Lansford uses his service dog, Gabe, as a brace to get off the ground. Gabe is actually able to prevent Lansford from falling about a third of the time, and is always there to help him up. He also takes the focus off of Lansford’s prosthetic when the two are in public. Gabe was placed with Lansford through Warrior Canine Connection, and was trained by service members recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
Service dog Gabe brings a set of keys to retired Staff Sgt. Justin Lansford. Gabe helps Lansford with many every day tasks, from bringing him items to opening doors. He also takes the focus off of Lansford’s prosthetic when the two are in public. Gabe was placed with Lansford through Warrior Canine Connection, and was trained by service members recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
Retired Staff Sgt. Justin Lansford poses with his service dog, Gabe, outside their home in Maryland. Gabe helps Lansford with many every day tasks, from bringing him items to opening doors. He also takes the focus off of Lansford’s prosthetic when the two are in public. Gabe was placed with Lansford through Warrior Canine Connection, and was trained by service members recovering from post-traumatic stress disorder at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. (DOD photo by Elizabeth M. Collins)
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