First to go

These special operators were the first American troops on the ground in Afghanistan after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks -- they are the "Horse Soldiers."

First to go First to go

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 3: On a mission

A doctor, a commander, a Soldier and an Army spouse talk suicide prevention and looking out for Soldiers. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 3: On a mission Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 3: On a mission

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 2: A life rebuilt

A suicidal first sergeant finds the strength to get help for PTSD and reclaim his life. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson)

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 2: A life rebuilt Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson, part 2: A life rebuilt

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson part 1: A broken life

One Soldier, leader and family man recalls being driven to the brink of suicide. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson part 1: A broken life Saving 1st Sgt. Jackson part 1: A broken life

Former West Point notables bring Army values to gridiron

Strong Army ties were in evidence when a small-university football team took to the field at historic Camp Blanding, Florida, for preseason camp. (DoD graphic by Peggy Frierson, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)

Former West Point notables bring Army values to gridiron Former West Point notables bring Army values to gridiron

Latest Features

Cpl. Ralph Hockley’s Bremen Detention Camp Pass from post-World War II Germany. (Photo courtesy of retired Col. Ralph M. Hockley)
5 May 2016

Witness to history

In his youth, Col. Ralph M. Hockley was a German Jew on the run from the Nazis. Years later, he would return to Germany as an American Soldier, fight in the Korean War and serve as a intelligence agent during the Cold War.

Army Strong Family
14 April 2016

Giving all they can

The McIntyre-Brewer family has remained selfless and resilient in the face of deployments and life-threatening illnesses, advocating for veterans, wounded warriors and sick children.

(U.S. Army graphic)
24 March 2016

Awarding the Medal of Honor

Army officials work to ensure heroes get the medals and recognition they deserve, even decades later.

Nicole Witmer, now a volunteer ambassador in the Veterans Ambassador Program, speaks with a veteran during the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center's Army Heritage Days in 2014. It was this event that she said inspired her to participate in the program.
10 November 2015

Every Army story is important

USAHEC's Veterans Ambassador Program aims to preserve the past through Soldiers' oral histories.

Sgt. Angelo Gepponi, who was a cook with the 77th Infantry Division in World War II, would paint scenes from daily life around camp. This watercolor, called "Field Mess Line (Untitled)," depicts Soldiers waiting to get chow. Gepponi's combat works will be displayed in the "Cook, Pot and Palette" exhibit at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, until December 2015. (Courtesy of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center)
9 September 2015

‘Cook, Pot and Palette’

Sgt. Angelo Gepponi’s field art from World War II continues to inspire artists today and serves as a witness to history.

Blog

2 November 2016

Disaster at Unsan

In early November 1950, U.S. troops would face Chinese Communist forces for the first time. The ensuing battle was among the Army’s bloodiest, but it was also a time of heroism and compassion.

28 October 2016

Faces of Best Medic

Meet a few of the U.S. Army expert medical professionals vying for Best Medic bragging rights.

17 June 2016

AW2 commander talks adaptive sports

Col. David S. Oeschger, one of the key members of the Army’s Warrior Transition Command, talks about his service, his wounds and how adaptive sports are helping Soldiers and veterans heal.

All Posts

Photos

Chaplain (Capt.) Emil Kapaun (right) and Capt. Jerome A. Dolan, a medical officer with the 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, carry an exhausted Soldier off the battlefield in Korea, early in the war. Kapaun was famous for exposing himself to enemy fire. When his battalion was overrun by a Chinese force in November 1950, rather than take an opportunity to escape, Kapaun voluntarily remained behind to minister to the wounded. In 2013, Kapaun posthumously received the Medal of Honor for his actions in the battle and later in a prisoner of war camp, where he died in May 1951. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center of Military History)
Sgt. 1st Class Louis F. Walz (left), Co. E, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Divisioin, and Pfc. Raymond M. Szukla, Co. G, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division, receive medical aid at the 8063rd Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, attached to I Corps in Korea, Nov. 4, 1950. Walz is recovering from a head wound and Pfc. Szukla suffered a wound in the right leg while engaged in action against Communist-led North Korean forces days earlier, likely during the Battle of Unsan. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center of Military History)
1st Lt. Pang and Sgt. 1st Class Eisele
Spc. Bynum
Sgt. Zesati and Sgt. Castillo
Sgt. Tainatongo
Master Sgt. Roy Benavidez salutes after receiving the Medal of Honor from President Ronald Reagan (right), Feb. 24, 1981. Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger is to his left. (Photo courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum)
President Barack Obama awards the Medal of Honor to Sgt. 1st Class Leroy A. Petry at the White House in Washington, D.C., July 12, 2011. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. David M. Sharp)
Sgt. Santiago J. Erevia (Photo courtesy of the Erevia family)
Master Sgt. Roy Benavidez salutes after receiving the Medal of Honor from President Ronald Reagan (right), Feb. 24, 1981. Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger is to his left. (Photo courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum)
All Photos

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