Remembering New Orleans: Guardsmen reflect on Katrina duty 10 years later

Remembering New Orleans: Guardsmen reflect on Katrina duty 10 years later

Remembering New Orleans: Guardsmen reflect on Katrina duty 10 years later Remembering New Orleans: Guardsmen reflect on Katrina duty 10 years later

An unbroken circle

Small-town Army NCO shaped by family, war and football Russ Currie had not yet been born when his uncle,… [more]

An unbroken circle An unbroken circle

New Parent Support Program helps Army families navigate trials of parenthood

Most parents, young or old, new or experienced, recall them with a haze of exhaustion-induced nostalgia:… [more]

New Parent Support Program helps Army families navigate trials of parenthood New Parent Support Program helps Army families navigate trials of parenthood

Battle dress through the centuries

From rags to spit-and-polish boots, from scratchy blue wool to the new operational camouflage pattern,… [more]

Battle dress through the centuries Battle dress through the centuries

Half a century of vivid memories

Army part of ambitious Vietnam commemoration It’s not a single, grand gathering. Like the… [more]

Half a century of vivid memories Half a century of vivid memories

Latest Features

A Modified version of the video game "Artemis," was the platform of choice during the 780th Military Intelligence Brigade's Cyber Capture the Flag exercise at the McGill Training Center on Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, May 19, 2015. Particpants used the modified game to help enhance their cyber capabilities. (DOD photo by Jacqueline M. Hames, Soldiers, Defense Media Activity)
2 July 2015

Gaming to win

Cyber Soldiers use a popular gaming platform to hone their offensive and defensive tactics.

A biohazard sign outside a support laboratory for the Whole System Live Agent Test chamber on Dugway Proving Ground, Utah. The WSLAT chamber can handle agents up to biological safety level three, which includes biological warfare agents that can cause treatable diseases in humans. (DOD photo by Jacqueline M. Hames)
2 April 2015

Clearing the air

The Whole System Live Agent Test chamber will enable U.S. Army scientists to evaluate the effectiveness of bio detection gear with warfighter safety in mind.

The M50 gas mask, Joint Services Aircrew Member MPU-5 and JSAM Fixed Wing masks featured in this image await SMARTMAN testing at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, Aug. 29, 2011. The SMARTMAN is a human bust fixture designed for testing gas masks and other breathing apparatus. (U.S. Army photo by Al Vogel)
27 March 2015

From test tube to battlefield

The U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground is in the business of validating defensive and offensive capabilities before putting them in the hands of warfighters.

A German tank crew guards a column of American prisoners of war during World War II. Like the members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, these men were doomed to a hellish existence until Allied troops began liberating POW camps in the spring of 1945. The men of the I&R Platoon had been captured on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944. Their 12-hour stand against a German battalion in Lanzerath, Belgium, helped delay the initial German force long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
26 January 2015

One more battle

After a 12-hour stand on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, the men of the 394th Regiment's Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon faced a new fight for survival in Nazi POW camps.

Private First Class Tammy Scriven, an information technology specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Signal Brigade, provides desktop computer support, Dec. 13, 2014, at the Barclay Training Center in Monrovia, Liberia. Scriven says her family does special things to let her know they are thinking of her during the holidays. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Rashene Mincy, 55th Signal Company-Combat Camera)
22 December 2014

Deployed during the holidays: staying connected

Deployments are hard on Soldiers and their families, but they can be especially difficult during the holidays. Soldiers and their families share ways to stay connected and reduce stress.

Deep in the Ardennes Forest, on a hill above the village of Lanzerath, Belgium, members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division would have camouflaged their foxholes like this unidentified unit. The foxholes, fortified with three to five thick logs each, helped the Soldiers not only withstand three German assaults the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944, but inflict withering casualties before they finally ran out of ammunition and were captured. They delayed the initial German force for half a day, long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
16 December 2014

The Battle of Lanzerath

Outnumbered 20 to one, this is the story of how a single U.S. Army intelligence and reconnaissance platoon held up the German advance, changing the outcome of the Battle of the Bulge.

Recon Warrior Challenge program participants explore a helicopter while touring Fort Benning, Georgia, July 1, 2014. (Photo courtesy of Staff Sgt. Rob McEver)
10 November 2014

Up to the challenge

This Fort Benning NCO is using what he’s learned in the Army to instill in local youth confidence, discipline and respect.

Blog

5 June 2015

Q & A with Joe Galloway

Soldiers talks to Joe Galloway, famed Vietnam War correspondent, author and veterans advocate, about the congressionally mandated Vietnam War Commemoration.

6 March 2015

Sleep tips from the experts

We know it can be tough to get a solid night’s sleep, so we turned to the Army’s sleep experts and tracked down their top tips.

5 December 2014

How to train a service dog

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Spencer Milo, who participated in the service dog-training program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, talks about what goes into getting a dog ready to partner with a wounded veteran.

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Photos

Following Hurricane Katrina, an Army National Guard helicopter lands on the rooftop of a New Orleans building to evacuate people to the Superdome. According to Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard, who spent 10 days in the Superdome, while the conditions were deplorable, most people came together and looked out for each other. (Photo courtesy of Col. Ed Bush)
Then-Capt. Brent Schultz of the West Virginia National Guard briefs his Soldiers in New Orleans as part of Hurricane Katrina relief operations in September 2005. Schultz and his team handled a lot of logistics and delivered supplies to survivors and other Guard units. They also were present for several rescues from flooded buildings. (Photo courtesy of the West Virginia National Guard)
A devastated neighborhood in Saint Bernard Parish, New Orleans, after Hurricane Katrina floodwaters finally receded in September 2005. Following the historic storm, which made landfall Aug. 29, 2005, Soldiers from all three components – active, Reserve and Guard from every state – streamed into Louisiana to help. Many of the city’s residents, like Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard, still haven’t moved back. “It’s too hard,” he said. (Photo courtesy of Col. Ed Bush)
National Guard Soldiers drive through a New Orleans neighborhood after Hurricane Katrina in September 2005. According to Maj. Brent Schultz, a member of the West Virginia National Guard's response team, Soldiers were still rescuing people from flooded houses almost two weeks after the storm. (Photo courtesy of the West Virginia National Guard)
A Soldier from the West Virginia National Guard loads pallets of water bottles as part of Hurricane Katrina relief efforts in New Orleans, September 2005. (Photo courtesy of the West Virginia National Guard)
Then Lt. Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard poses on the range during a deployment. Although Bush has deployed to both Iraq and Afghanistan, he says his most emotional duty was the 10 days he spent in the Superdome during and following Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans, Aug. 29, 2005. He calls it the “best of times and the worst of times” – the best for the human kindness and spirit he saw, the worst for the deplorable conditions the people endured. (Photo courtesy of Col. Ed Bush)
A woman scolds a crowd that had grown restless after living for days in the New Orleans Superdome without power or running water following Hurricane Katrina. She started to pray and then she started to sing and prevented what could have been a nasty situation, said Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard, pictured here to the left. (Photo courtesy of Col. Ed Bush)
A woman dressed as a clown entertains children in the Superdome in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. She was one of many people who made a difference, helping others despite the deplorable conditions inside the Superdome, said Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard, who spent 10 days on duty in the stadium. (Photo courtesy of Col. Ed Bush)
A father, stranded at the Superdome in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, reads to his children. According to Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard, the moment was one of the most moving he experienced in the 10 days he spent at the Superdome. “There’s something very special about reading to your child,” he said. “To see a dad doing that there at the dome, keeping his kids safe, was ... emotionally overwhelming. It was a beautiful thing, but it was also unbelievably sad.” (Photo courtesy of Col. Ed Bush)
Trash piled outside the Superdome in New Orleans, after some 40,000 people (who had been living there for 10 days following Hurricane Katrina) were evacuated. Col. Ed Bush of the Louisiana National Guard was on mission there, and said despite the squalid conditions, most people came together and looked out for each other. (Photo courtesy of the West Virginia National Guard)
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