WWII veteran returns to Dutch cave to honor those who ‘left their mark’

In September 1944, Maastricht was the first Dutch city to be liberated by the Allies during World War… [more]

WWII veteran returns to Dutch cave to honor those who ‘left their mark’ WWII veteran returns to Dutch cave to honor those who 'left their mark'

The healing power of dogs

Soldiers with PTSD train service dogs for wounded veterans   Sometimes the best therapy… [more]

The healing power of dogs The healing power of dogs

Horse healing

Veterans take to the farm to overcome invisible war wounds On an expansive, scenic farm in Solvang,… [more]

Horse healing Horse healing

The sergeant major of the Army: Leader and communicator

At the heart of today’s Army is a noncommissioned officer corps that values professionalism and excellence… [more]

The sergeant major of the Army: Leader and communicator The sergeant major of the Army: Leader and communicator

Grief that never dies

Gold Star Mothers share their stories The Vietnam mother Emogene Cupp opened her door one… [more]

Grief that never dies Grief that never dies

Latest Features

A German tank crew guards a column of American prisoners of war during World War II. Like the members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, these men were doomed to a hellish existence until Allied troops began liberating POW camps in the spring of 1945. The men of the I&R Platoon had been captured on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944. Their 12-hour stand against a German battalion in Lanzerath, Belgium, helped delay the initial German force long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
26 January 2015

One more battle

After a 12-hour stand on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, the men of the 394th Regiment's Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon faced a new fight for survival in Nazi POW camps.

Private First Class Tammy Scriven, an information technology specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Signal Brigade, provides desktop computer support, Dec. 13, 2014, at the Barclay Training Center in Monrovia, Liberia. Scriven says her family does special things to let her know they are thinking of her during the holidays. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Rashene Mincy, 55th Signal Company-Combat Camera)
22 December 2014

Deployed during the holidays: staying connected

Deployments are hard on Soldiers and their families, but they can be especially difficult during the holidays. Soldiers and their families share ways to stay connected and reduce stress.

Deep in the Ardennes Forest, on a hill above the village of Lanzerath, Belgium, members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division would have camouflaged their foxholes like this unidentified unit. The foxholes, fortified with three to five thick logs each, helped the Soldiers not only withstand three German assaults the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944, but inflict withering casualties before they finally ran out of ammunition and were captured. They delayed the initial German force for half a day, long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
16 December 2014

The Battle of Lanzerath

Outnumbered 20 to one, this is the story of how a single U.S. Army intelligence and reconnaissance platoon held up the German advance, changing the outcome of the Battle of the Bulge.

Recon Warrior Challenge program participants explore a helicopter while touring Fort Benning, Georgia, July 1, 2014. (Photo courtesy of Staff Sgt. Rob McEver)
10 November 2014

Up to the challenge

This Fort Benning NCO is using what he’s learned in the Army to instill in local youth confidence, discipline and respect.

Chef Robert Irvine and actor Gary Sinise welcome Staff Sgt. Tony Wood and his wife Joedi to their newly renovated home on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Irvine, Sinise, Wood’s buddy Bryan Anderson (in the wheelchair) and hundreds of volunteers surprised the couple by fixing and decorating their home, which had started falling apart almost as soon as they bought it to accommodate their biological children, adopted children and foster children. Wood, who was wounded in Iraq, has overcome massive internal injuries, traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder to stay in the Army. The special will air across six channels the evening of Veterans Day. (Photo by Jeremiah Alley, courtesy of the Food Network)
10 November 2014

A Hero’s Welcome

Hundreds of friends, neighbors and fellow Soldiers team up with celebrities and open their hearts to help a Soldier and his wife continue to open their home to foster kids.

Never forgotten
6 October 2014

Faith, friends and paying it forward

When her husband was killed in Afghanistan in 2011, a widow and her three children left the Fort Drum, New York, area they knew and loved. Today, they are back, and serving as a link between Soldiers and the community.

Capt. Justin Fitch
25 August 2014

A sense of mission, to the end

If doctors said you had a finite amount of time left, how would you spend your remaining days? It’s a question U.S. Army Capt. Justin Fitch has already answered.

Blog

5 December 2014

How to train a service dog

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Spencer Milo, who participated in the service dog-training program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, talks about what goes into getting a dog ready to partner with a wounded veteran.

26 September 2014

Please, ask me about my son

Gold Star Mother and retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Candy Martin doesn't mind when you ask about her Soldier son, who was killed by insurgents in Iraq in 2007. But don't ever ask her if she's "gotten over it."

All Posts

Photos

2-6CavKoreaRotation
A German tank crew guards a column of American prisoners of war during World War II. Like the members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, these men were doomed to a hellish existence until Allied troops began liberating POW camps in the spring of 1945. The men of the I&R Platoon had been captured on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944. Their 12-hour stand against a German battalion in Lanzerath, Belgium, helped delay the initial German force long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
A German tank crew guards a column of American prisoners of war during World War II. Like the members of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, 394th Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, these men were doomed to a hellish existence until Allied troops began liberating POW camps in the spring of 1945. The men of the I&R Platoon had been captured on the first day of the Battle of the Bulge, Dec. 16, 1944. Their 12-hour stand against a German battalion in Lanzerath, Belgium, helped delay the initial German force long enough for the Allies to move troops and reinforce critical positions, thereby helping win the battle. The men were finally recognized for their bravery in 1981 with a Presidential Unit Citation, four Distinguished Service Crosses, five Silver Stars and 9 Bronze Stars with V device, making the platoon the most decorated of World War II. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Army Center for Military History)
Pfc. Shane Sital, assigned to U.S. Army Garrison Schinnen, Netherlands, reads scripture during a Christmas Eve Mass in the Schark Cave to commemorate the Mass held there 70 years earlier. For many of the Soldiers who attended the 1944 service, it would be their last Christmas Eve -- they would die fighting in the Battle of the Bulge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Rich Komurek)
Chuck Wisler helps his father Robert find his name on the wall of the Schark Cave, where he attended Christmas Eve Mass and celebrated his 20th birthday 70 years earlier. The Soldiers who attended the mass wrote their names on the wall of the cave in charcoal, and many of those who attended were sent to the Battle of the Bulge and died fighting there. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Rich Komurek)
The wall in the the Schark Cave, Maastricht, Netherlands, where more than 300 American Soldiers wrote their names following a Christmas Eve Mass there in 1944. Many of the Soldiers who left their marks in the cave never returned home -- they were killed fighting in the Battle of the Bulge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Rich Komurek)
A Soldier reads the names on a wall inside the Schark Cave, where, in 1944, hundreds of Soldiers left their marks in charcoal and attended Christmas Eve Mass before fighting in the Battle of the Bulge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Rich Komurek)
Soldiers huddle in the Schark Cave in Maastricht, Netherlands, for Christmas Eve Mass in 1944. Many of the Soldiers in attendance were sent to the Battle of the Bulge and died fighting there. (Photo courtesy of The Foundation of the Commemoration of the American Christmas Celebration 1944)
Now 90, a former U.S. Army supply sergeant returns to the Schark Cave in the Netherlands, where, 70 years ago, hundreds of Soldiers found solace from war at a Christmas Eve Mass. Many of those in attendance would not come home. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Rich Komurek)
Pfc. Tammy Scriven, an information technology specialist assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 35th Signal Brigade, provides desktop computer support, Dec. 13, 2014, at the Barclay Training Center in Monrovia, Liberia. Scriven says although it's tough being away from her family, "when the holidays come around next year, it will be even more special ... knowing that I have a whole new appreciation of my family and our time together." (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Rashene Mincy, 55th Signal Company-Combat Camera)
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