Blue Platoon

The members of Blue Platoon, Bravo “Black Knight” Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, pose on Outpost Fritsche in the late spring/early summer of 2009. Then-Spc. Ty Carter, who will receive the Medal of Honor this month for his actions during the battle for Combat Outpost Keating, Oct. 3, 2009, is standing in the far left of the front row. His platoon sergeant, then-Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Hill, who was instrumental in getting Carter help when he developed PTSD after the battle, is the fifth from the left in the back row. Eight Soldiers died during the battle, including Spc. Michael Scusa (front row, second from left) and Spc. Chris Griffin (front row, second from right). Spc. Ed Faulkner Jr. (front row, fourth from left) was medevaced home with his injuries and later died of an overdose. Carter considers him the ninth victim of COP Keating and said if it hadn’t been for Hill and behavioral health professionals, the same thing would have happened to him. (Photo courtesy of retired 1st Sgt. Jonathan Hill)

The members of Blue Platoon, Bravo “Black Knight” Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, pose on Outpost Fritsche in the late spring/early summer of 2009. Then-Spc. Ty Carter, who will receive the Medal of Honor this month for his actions during the battle for Combat Outpost Keating, Oct. 3, 2009, is standing in the far left of the front row. His platoon sergeant, then-Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Hill, who was instrumental in getting Carter help when he developed PTSD after the battle, is the fifth from the left in the back row. Eight Soldiers died during the battle, including Spc. Michael Scusa (front row, second from left) and Spc. Chris Griffin (front row, second from right). Spc. Ed Faulkner Jr. (front row, fourth from left) was medevaced home with his injuries and later died of an overdose. Carter considers him the ninth victim of COP Keating and said if it hadn’t been for Hill and behavioral health professionals, the same thing would have happened to him. (Photo courtesy of retired 1st Sgt. Jonathan Hill)